The Other Clouds: Digital Ocean and Kubernetes

Published: May 11, 2019 by Isaac Johnson

Another fantastic public cloud provider outside the big three is DigitalOcean. Known for high speeds and low costs, they’ve been around for 7 years and have quite a fan base. According to Hackernoon “Their network speed is 1Gbps; all hard disks are SSD and an incredible start-up time of only 55 secs. DigitalOcean nodes are placed at the top by independent performance tests, way far above Amazon machines.”

In our pursuit of a great k8s host, how does DO stack up?  Let’s cast a line and sea. We’ll look into 3 different ways to create and manage k8s clusters: The web dashboard, Terraform and Doctl.

Using the Dashboard:

We can create a cluster from the “Create” menu.  Just choose clusters, a k8s version and your datacenter region.

Creating a Cluster in the UI

Next step is to pick our machine type for the cluster pool and how many nodes.  This is our one chance to get a sense of total cost.  

The 3 default droplets at $10/mo apiece make for a $30/mo cluster less any extra storage.

Next we work through the wizard.

Download the kubeconfig from actions

Go to Actions and download the config. Then copy it to ~/.kube:

$ mv ~/Downloads/k8s-1-14-1-do-2-sfo2-1557194898984-kubeconfig.yaml ~/.kube

Let’s check out how many nodes our cluster has (from the cluster).

$ cd ~/.kube && kubectl --kubeconfig="k8s-1-14-1-do-2-sfo2-1557194898984-kubeconfig.yaml" get nodes
NAME STATUS ROLES AGE VERSION
pool-sle63apae-f8mb Ready <none> 8m58s v1.14.1
pool-sle63apae-f8mg Ready <none> 8m13s v1.14.1
pool-sle63apae-f8mw Ready <none> 8m56s v1.14.1

Installing Helm

$ helm init
$HELM_HOME has been configured at /Users/isaac.johnson/.helm.

Tiller (the Helm server-side component) has been installed into your Kubernetes Cluster.

Please note: by default, Tiller is deployed with an insecure 'allow unauthenticated users' policy.
To prevent this, run `helm init` with the --tiller-tls-verify flag.
For more information on securing your installation see: https://docs.helm.sh/using_helm/#securing-your-helm-installation
Happy Helming!

RBAC setup for Helm

$ kubectl create serviceaccount --namespace kube-system tiller
serviceaccount/tiller created

$ kubectl create clusterrolebinding tiller-cluster-rule --clusterrole=cluster-admin --serviceaccount=kube-system:tiller
clusterrolebinding.rbac.authorization.k8s.io/tiller-cluster-rule created

$ kubectl patch deploy --namespace kube-system tiller-deploy -p '{"spec":{"template":{"spec":{"serviceAccount":"tiller"}}}}'
deployment.extensions/tiller-deploy patched

Testing

Installing Sonarqube to test

$ helm install stable/sonarqube --tiller-namespace kube-system
NAME: historical-sabertooth
LAST DEPLOYED: Mon May 6 21:29:37 2019
NAMESPACE: default
STATUS: DEPLOYED

RESOURCES:
==> v1/ConfigMap
NAME DATA AGE
historical-sabertooth-sonarqube-config 0 1s
historical-sabertooth-sonarqube-copy-plugins 1 1s
historical-sabertooth-sonarqube-install-plugins 1 1s
historical-sabertooth-sonarqube-tests 1 1s

==> v1/PersistentVolumeClaim
NAME STATUS VOLUME CAPACITY ACCESS MODES STORAGECLASS AGE
historical-sabertooth-postgresql Pending do-block-storage 1s

==> v1/Pod(related)
NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
historical-sabertooth-postgresql-9cbd8bbd7-hkkpw 0/1 Pending 0 0s
historical-sabertooth-sonarqube-7d89cb8698-c5687 0/1 ContainerCreating 0 0s

==> v1/Secret
NAME TYPE DATA AGE
historical-sabertooth-postgresql Opaque 1 1s

==> v1/Service
NAME TYPE CLUSTER-IP EXTERNAL-IP PORT(S) AGE
historical-sabertooth-postgresql ClusterIP 10.245.203.154 <none> 5432/TCP 1s
historical-sabertooth-sonarqube LoadBalancer 10.245.209.133 <pending> 9000:30449/TCP 1s

==> v1beta1/Deployment
NAME READY UP-TO-DATE AVAILABLE AGE
historical-sabertooth-postgresql 0/1 1 0 1s
historical-sabertooth-sonarqube 0/1 1 0 1s


NOTES:
1. Get the application URL by running these commands:
     NOTE: It may take a few minutes for the LoadBalancer IP to be available.
           You can watch the status of by running 'kubectl get svc -w historical-sabertooth-sonarqube'
  export SERVICE_IP=$(kubectl get svc --namespace default historical-sabertooth-sonarqube -o jsonpath='{.status.loadBalancer.ingress[0].ip}')
  echo http://$SERVICE_IP:9000

Get the public IP

$ kubectl get svc --namespace default historical-sabertooth-sonarqube -o jsonpath='{.status.loadBalancer.ingress[0].ip}'
138.68.37.42
checking out our running Sonarqube instance

We can also see details about the created loadbalancer in the DO LB panel:

The droplets dashboard is also where we can see the states of our worker nodes:

Scaling

From the Nodes page on the Cluster we can clip the ellipse menu and choose “resize” to scale horizontally

scale in or out with the Update Node Count menu

We can also go into each droplet to resize (vertically scale):

We can also access some advanced cluster settings in the Kubernetes cluster dashboard.  If your cluster, for instance, serves http and https, you can have it auto-redirect http to https by changing a quick toggle:

Cleaning up:

First we will want to clean up things we deployed with helm:

$ helm list
NAME REVISION	UPDATED STATUS CHART APP VERSION	NAMESPACE
historical-sabertooth	1 Mon May 6 21:29:37 2019	DEPLOYED	sonarqube-1.0.0	7.7 default  

$ kubectl get pods --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
default historical-sabertooth-postgresql-9cbd8bbd7-hkkpw 1/1 Running 0 23m
default historical-sabertooth-sonarqube-7d89cb8698-c5687 1/1 Running 0 23m
kube-system cilium-fw6wd 1/1 Running 0 36m
kube-system cilium-operator-5469488bbb-ktrlc 1/1 Running 0 38m
kube-system cilium-rmqqb 1/1 Running 0 37m
kube-system cilium-xj7tb 1/1 Running 0 37m
kube-system coredns-5f44b47f5f-599lk 1/1 Running 0 38m
kube-system coredns-5f44b47f5f-pb428 1/1 Running 0 38m
kube-system csi-do-node-5rwhp 2/2 Running 0 36m
kube-system csi-do-node-jwngx 2/2 Running 0 36m
kube-system csi-do-node-zfdm8 2/2 Running 0 35m
kube-system do-node-agent-cn5v6 1/1 Running 0 36m
kube-system do-node-agent-sc4w4 1/1 Running 0 35m
kube-system do-node-agent-txdc6 1/1 Running 0 36m
kube-system kube-proxy-hk7f6 1/1 Running 0 37m
kube-system kube-proxy-jr8g2 1/1 Running 0 37m
kube-system kube-proxy-qnzsc 1/1 Running 0 36m
kube-system tiller-deploy-8458f6c667-zfh7z 1/1 Running 0 23m


$ helm delete historical-sabertooth
release "historical-sabertooth" deleted

$ kubectl get pods --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
kube-system cilium-fw6wd 1/1 Running 0 37m
kube-system cilium-operator-5469488bbb-ktrlc 1/1 Running 0 39m
kube-system cilium-rmqqb 1/1 Running 0 38m
kube-system cilium-xj7tb 1/1 Running 0 38m
kube-system coredns-5f44b47f5f-599lk 1/1 Running 0 39m
kube-system coredns-5f44b47f5f-pb428 1/1 Running 0 39m
kube-system csi-do-node-5rwhp 2/2 Running 0 37m
kube-system csi-do-node-jwngx 2/2 Running 0 37m
kube-system csi-do-node-zfdm8 2/2 Running 0 36m
kube-system do-node-agent-cn5v6 1/1 Running 0 37m
kube-system do-node-agent-sc4w4 1/1 Running 0 36m
kube-system do-node-agent-txdc6 1/1 Running 0 37m
kube-system kube-proxy-hk7f6 1/1 Running 0 38m
kube-system kube-proxy-jr8g2 1/1 Running 0 38m
kube-system kube-proxy-qnzsc 1/1 Running 0 37m
kube-system tiller-deploy-8458f6c667-zfh7z 1/1 Running 0 25m

Then we can destroy the cluster from the dashboard menu. Choose Destroy from the More menu:

Click the Destroy in the menu

You can then check for droplets (it deletes pretty fast):

Terraform

Another way we can launch and manage a cluster is with Hashicorp Terraform. You can download from here. See our other guides or their quick start guide on installing TF.

Go to an empty directory and do a TF init:

$ terraform init

Initializing provider plugins...
- Checking for available provider plugins on https://releases.hashicorp.com...
- Downloading plugin for provider "digitalocean" (1.2.0)...
- Downloading plugin for provider "kubernetes" (1.6.2)...

The following providers do not have any version constraints in configuration,
so the latest version was installed.

To prevent automatic upgrades to new major versions that may contain breaking
changes, it is recommended to add version = "..." constraints to the
corresponding provider blocks in configuration, with the constraint strings
suggested below.

* provider.digitalocean: version = "~> 1.2"
* provider.kubernetes: version = "~> 1.6"

Terraform has been successfully initialized!

You may now begin working with Terraform. Try running "terraform plan" to see
any changes that are required for your infrastructure. All Terraform commands
should now work.

If you ever set or change modules or backend configuration for Terraform,
rerun this command to reinitialize your working directory. If you forget, other
commands will detect it and remind you to do so if necessary.

Next we need our DO API key. You can get that from Manage/API if you don’t have it already:

You can generate a new key if you've forgotten the last here as well

Create a main.tf to describe our cluster:

Main.tf:
# Set the variable value in *.tfvars file
# or using -var="do_token=..." CLI option
variable "do_token" {}

# Configure the DigitalOcean Provider
provider "digitalocean" {
  token = "${var.do_token}"
}

# Create a cluster
resource "digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster" "foo" {
  name = "foo"
  region = "nyc1"
  version = "1.14.1-do.2"
  tags = ["staging"]

  node_pool {
    name = "worker-pool"
    size = "s-2vcpu-2gb"
    node_count = 3
  }
}

provider "kubernetes" {
  host = "${digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo.endpoint}"

  client_certificate = "${base64decode(digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo.kube_config.0.client_certificate)}"
  client_key = "${base64decode(digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo.kube_config.0.client_key)}"
  cluster_ca_certificate = "${base64decode(digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo.kube_config.0.cluster_ca_certificate)}"
}

output "cluster-id" {
  value = "${digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo.id}"
}

Next we need to do a TF plan (and pass in our key).  If we plan to do this a few times, we can use a tfvars file.

$ terraform plan -var="do_token=73e32d ************************************************* 4a221ba1" -out tfplan
Refreshing Terraform state in-memory prior to plan...
The refreshed state will be used to calculate this plan, but will not be
persisted to local or remote state storage.


------------------------------------------------------------------------

An execution plan has been generated and is shown below.
Resource actions are indicated with the following symbols:
  + create

Terraform will perform the following actions:

  + digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo
      id: <computed>
      cluster_subnet: <computed>
      created_at: <computed>
      endpoint: <computed>
      ipv4_address: <computed>
      kube_config.#: <computed>
      name: "foo"
      node_pool.#: "1"
      node_pool.0.id: <computed>
      node_pool.0.name: "worker-pool"
      node_pool.0.node_count: "3"
      node_pool.0.nodes.#: <computed>
      node_pool.0.size: "s-2vcpu-2gb"
      region: "nyc1"
      service_subnet: <computed>
      status: <computed>
      tags.#: "1"
      tags.3176302885: "staging"
      updated_at: <computed>
      version: "1.14.1-do.2"


Plan: 1 to add, 0 to change, 0 to destroy.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

This plan was saved to: tfplan

To perform exactly these actions, run the following command to apply:
    terraform apply "tfplan"

If we are satisfied, we can execute our plan

$ terraform apply -input=false -auto-approve ./tfplan
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Creating...
  cluster_subnet: "" => "<computed>"
  created_at: "" => "<computed>"
  endpoint: "" => "<computed>"
  ipv4_address: "" => "<computed>"
  kube_config.#: "" => "<computed>"
  name: "" => "foo"
  node_pool.#: "" => "1"
  node_pool.0.id: "" => "<computed>"
  node_pool.0.name: "" => "worker-pool"
  node_pool.0.node_count: "" => "3"
  node_pool.0.nodes.#: "" => "<computed>"
  node_pool.0.size: "" => "s-2vcpu-2gb"
  region: "" => "nyc1"
  service_subnet: "" => "<computed>"
  status: "" => "<computed>"
  tags.#: "" => "1"
  tags.3176302885: "" => "staging"
  updated_at: "" => "<computed>"
  version: "" => "1.14.1-do.2"
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (10s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (20s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (30s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (40s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (50s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (1m0s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (1m10s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (1m20s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (1m30s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (1m40s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (1m50s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (2m0s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (2m10s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (2m20s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (2m30s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (2m40s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Still creating... (2m50s elapsed)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Creation complete after 2m52s (ID: 930d90e1-11c3-4284-a280-f8de949e3938)

Apply complete! Resources: 1 added, 0 changed, 0 destroyed.

This next step is my only real gripe with the current TF outputs available.  They should just make the kubeconfig a standard out, but unfortunately it’s been broken down into a few keys so we’ll do the following to produce a usable kubeconfig:

export TF_VAR_do_token=73e32d ************************************************* 4a221ba1
export TF_VAR_do_cluster_name=foo

Git_config (from ponderosa-io/tf-digital-ocean-cluster):

CLUSTER_ID=$(terraform output cluster-id)
OUTFILE="config"
echo "getting cluster config for $CLUSTER_ID"
curl -X GET -H "Content-Type: application/json" -H "Authorization: Bearer ${TF_VAR_do_token}" "https://api.digitalocean.com/v2/kubernetes/clusters/$CLUSTER_ID/kubeconfig" > $OUTFILE

We can run the above and copy the kubeconfig over:

./get_config 
getting cluster config for 930d90e1-11c3-4284-a280-f8de949e3938
  % Total % Received % Xferd Average Speed Time Time Time Current
                                 Dload Upload Total Spent Left Speed
100 5970 0 5970 0 0 8602 0 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:-- 8602

$ cp config ~/.kube/config

Now let’s check our pods to see that kubeconfig works

$ kubectl get pods --all-namespaces
NAMESPACE NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
kube-system cilium-82x69 1/1 Running 0 30m
kube-system cilium-operator-5469488bbb-zjlv6 1/1 Running 0 31m
kube-system cilium-s6mpc 1/1 Running 0 30m
kube-system cilium-s9g99 1/1 Running 0 30m
kube-system coredns-5f44b47f5f-4pv5x 1/1 Running 0 31m
kube-system coredns-5f44b47f5f-qxccm 1/1 Running 0 31m
kube-system csi-do-node-5nh8f 2/2 Running 0 29m
kube-system csi-do-node-bm4h7 2/2 Running 0 29m
kube-system csi-do-node-s9p65 2/2 Running 0 29m
kube-system do-node-agent-65rwt 1/1 Running 0 29m
kube-system do-node-agent-dchjv 1/1 Running 0 29m
kube-system do-node-agent-f5692 1/1 Running 0 29m
kube-system kube-proxy-5w8vk 1/1 Running 0 30m
kube-system kube-proxy-fh2v6 1/1 Running 0 30m
kube-system kube-proxy-mfqgr 1/1 Running 0 30m

Deleting the cluster with TF is just as easy:

$ terraform destroy
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Refreshing state... (ID: 930d90e1-11c3-4284-a280-f8de949e3938)

An execution plan has been generated and is shown below.
Resource actions are indicated with the following symbols:
  - destroy

Terraform will perform the following actions:

  - digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo


Plan: 0 to add, 0 to change, 1 to destroy.

Do you really want to destroy?
  Terraform will destroy all your managed infrastructure, as shown above.
  There is no undo. Only 'yes' will be accepted to confirm.

  Enter a value: yes

digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Destroying... (ID: 930d90e1-11c3-4284-a280-f8de949e3938)
digitalocean_kubernetes_cluster.foo: Destruction complete after 0s

Destroy complete! Resources: 1 destroyed.

Doctl

We have one more way to easily create and manage clusters and that is with Doctl, the DigitalOcean command line client.

First we install with brew:

$ brew install doctl
Updating Homebrew...
==> Auto-updated Homebrew!
Updated 3 taps (homebrew/core, homebrew/cask and caskroom/versions).
==> New Formulae
gcc@8 imapsync proteinortho
==> Updated Formulae
azure-cli ✔ dungeon kotlin phpunit
gcc ✔ dynare kubeprod plplot
abyss easyengine lapack postgresql@9.6
agda eccodes leveldb pulumi
aliyun-cli fastme libdazzle qpdf
allure fftw libgda qrupdate
ant flow libgsf r
apache-spark fn libomp reprepro
argyll-cms geos libxc root
armadillo ghq logstash roswell
arpack gjs logtalk scalapack
asciidoctor glooctl lxc scipy
basex go lysp serverless
bazel godep mmseqs2 simple-scan
binwalk gomplate mpich skaffold
bitcoin grib-api mvnvm socat
buildkit gst-validate netcdf spades
bwfmetaedit gtk-doc nethack syncthing
bzt gtksourceview3 nwchem terraforming
calicoctl hdf5 octave travis
cargo-completion hdf5@1.8 open-mpi ttyd
ccache i2pd openblas ucloud
cfn-lint imake opencoarrays vegeta
cp2k istioctl osmosis velero
crosstool-ng jenkins packmol vim
dep joplin percona-xtrabackup vte3
docker json-fortran petsc yarn
docker-completion juju petsc-complex yelp-tools
doctl kahip pgplot youtube-dl
==> Deleted Formulae
minisat

==> Downloading https://homebrew.bintray.com/bottles/doctl-1.17.0.mojave.bottle.
==> Downloading from https://akamai.bintray.com/a8/a81286aa76b8c9dccdf87d29aa6c0
######################################################################## 100.0%
==> Pouring doctl-1.17.0.mojave.bottle.tar.gz
==> Caveats
Bash completion has been installed to:
  /usr/local/etc/bash_completion.d

zsh functions have been installed to:
  /usr/local/share/zsh/site-functions
==> Summary
🍺 /usr/local/Cellar/doctl/1.17.0: 8 files, 21.7MB

Next, set the experimental features to enable kubernetes management:

$ export DIGITALOCEAN_ENABLE_BETA=1

Login using your token:

$ doctl auth init
DigitalOcean access token: 
Validating token... OK

Creating a cluster:

$ doctl k8s cluster create mycluster --count 3 
Notice: cluster is provisioning, waiting for cluster to be running
........................................
Notice: cluster created, fetching credentials
Notice: adding cluster credentials to kubeconfig file found in "/Users/isaac.johnson/.kube/config"
ID Name Region Version Status Node Pools
596cfd5a-d376-4836-9815-5bdfb6a60575 mycluster nyc1 1.14.1-do.2 running mycluster-default-pool

$ kubectl get pods --all-namespaces --kubeconfig=kubeconfig.dctl 
NAMESPACE NAME READY STATUS RESTARTS AGE
kube-system cilium-26n4n 1/1 Running 0 7m12s
kube-system cilium-cx9wt 1/1 Running 0 7m31s
kube-system cilium-m2gb6 1/1 Running 0 7m19s
kube-system cilium-operator-5469488bbb-86lj5 1/1 Running 0 8m49s
kube-system coredns-5f44b47f5f-fqrn2 1/1 Running 0 8m49s
kube-system coredns-5f44b47f5f-pk5hf 1/1 Running 0 8m49s
kube-system csi-do-node-9phkc 2/2 Running 0 6m29s
kube-system csi-do-node-j7tn8 2/2 Running 0 6m10s
kube-system csi-do-node-qlgsv 2/2 Running 0 6m31s
kube-system do-node-agent-4g6z5 1/1 Running 0 6m31s
kube-system do-node-agent-6jcjh 1/1 Running 0 6m29s
kube-system do-node-agent-ftr9v 1/1 Running 0 6m10s
kube-system kube-proxy-6lsgr 1/1 Running 0 7m19s
kube-system kube-proxy-q2cfh 1/1 Running 0 7m31s
kube-system kube-proxy-s7d9w 1/1 Running 0 7m12s

Listing details on our running cluster:

$ doctl k8s cluster node-pool list 596cfd5a-d376-4836-9815-5bdfb6a60575
ID Name Size Count Tags Nodes
63cdafcb-2b11-4f9f-b1fc-508881cee472 mycluster-default-pool s-1vcpu-2gb 3 k8s,k8s:596cfd5a-d376-4836-9815-5bdfb6a60575,k8s:worker [mycluster-default-pool-fb04 mycluster-default-pool-fb0i mycluster-default-pool-fb0v]

Scaling

We can easily scale out, for instance, from 3 to 4 nodes:

$ doctl k8s cluster node-pool update 596cfd5a-d376-4836-9815-5bdfb6a60575 mycluster-default-pool --count 4 --name mycluster-default-pool
ID Name Size Count Tags Nodes
63cdafcb-2b11-4f9f-b1fc-508881cee472 mycluster-default-pool s-1vcpu-2gb 4 k8s,k8s:596cfd5a-d376-4836-9815-5bdfb6a60575,k8s:worker [mycluster-default-pool-fb04 mycluster-default-pool-fb0i mycluster-default-pool-fb0v]

And see that a new droplet is being created for us:

We can scale in just as easily

$ doctl k8s cluster node-pool update 596cfd5a-d376-4836-9815-5bdfb6a60575 mycluster-default-pool --count 2 --name mycluster-default-pool
ID Name Size Count Tags Nodes
63cdafcb-2b11-4f9f-b1fc-508881cee472 mycluster-default-pool s-1vcpu-2gb 2 k8s,k8s:596cfd5a-d376-4836-9815-5bdfb6a60575,k8s:worker [mycluster-default-pool-fb04 mycluster-default-pool-fb0i mycluster-default-pool-fb0v mycluster-default-pool-fb1o]
the extra two droplets were immediately destroyed

To vertically scale you can use the UI or the REST API (but sadly not the doctl compute droplet nor doctl k8s in the CLI - at least for what i see at the moment)

curl -X POST -H 'Content-Type: application/json' \
    -H 'Authorization: Bearer EXAMPLE947b217efb6f3ec3bdEXAMPLE' \
    -d '{"type":"resize","size": s-2vcpu-4gb","disk":true}' \
    "https://api.digitalocean.com/v2/droplets/droplet_id/actions"

Deleting

$ doctl k8s cluster delete 596cfd5a-d376-4836-9815-5bdfb6a60575
Warning: Are you sure you want to delete this Kubernetes cluster (y/N) ? y
Notice: cluster deleted, removing credentials
Notice: removing cluster credentials from kubeconfig file found in "/Users/isaac.johnson/.kube/config"

I thought it was a nice touch that the doctl delete takes care of the default kubernetes config file as well.

All the droplets removed

Summary

In our last blog post we explored Linode and that had a perfectly sufficient offering. However if we priced it out, Linode was pretty close to AKS in price. DigitalOcean, on the other hand, is a very compelling offering.  Some of the best features:

  1. Three ways to manage clusters - A web based wizard, Terraform and Doctl (CLI)
  2. Fast launching of clusters
  3. Exceptional pricing

In fact, for the demos above, i expected a spend of a couple of bucks.  After all, i had launched a few clusters and an app and in AKS and Linode, that was usually in the range of $1-3.

So imagine my surprise when I checked and my total spend was 5 cents.

In fact, for all hammering I’ve done so far I’ve managed to burn 15 cents of my $100 credit.  I’m tempted to DO for my next personal cluster as it’s performance has been just fantastic for a stellar price.

_ plug : if you want to get the same $100 credit deal, use this referral link._

k8s getting-started tutorial digitalocean

Isaac Johnson

Isaac Johnson

Cloud Solutions Architect

Isaac is a CSA and DevOps engineer who focuses on cloud migrations and devops processes. He also is a dad to three wonderful daughters (hence the references to Princess King sprinkled throughout the blog).

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